Tag Archives | ports

The Coastal History Blog 24: “Port Geography at the Crossroads”

Cloistered subfields predictably produce cloistered scholarship. Cloistered scholarship is, as a rule, quite dull.  Why, then, does cloistering exercise such a fatal attraction for so many academics? A new article in the Journal of Transport Geography confronts this dilemma in an unusually honest way.  “Port Geography at the Crossroads”—co-authored by nine academics based variously in […]

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Mapping the Waterfront: Life, Heritage and Visualization of the Port City

Department of Historical Studies, Gothenburg University, Sweden, 9th September 2014 A recent workshop by the Universities of Gothenburg and Portsmouth brought together academics, archivists and heritage professionals to discuss the methodologies, data and potential beneficiaries of mapping port towns. Dr Tomas Nilson and Dr Brad Beaven opened proceedings and explained that the history of port […]

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CFP: Self, Other & Elsewhere: Images & Imagination in the Port Cities of Atlantic & Mediterranean Europe

Call for Papers for the following conference, Self, Other & Elsewhere: Images & Imagination in the Port Cities of Atlantic & Mediterranean Europe, held in Bordeaux 11th – 12th May. In these times when urban marketing is being applied to outline the identity of our cities with a view to promoting it more effectively, this […]

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The Coastal History Blog 22: “The Trained Researcher’s Eye… and What It Misses”

Many historians, young and old, nurse the lingering hope that their next round of research will uncover that career-making revelation, their personal equivalent of Carlo Ginzburg’s benandanti or Robert Darnton’s Great Cat Massacre. But if it turned up right in front of you, would you notice it?  Don’t be so sure. Consider the sad case […]

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The Coastal History Blog 21: “The ‘Cosmopolitan Port Town’—Is There Any Other Kind?”

Michael Pearson, in his book The Indian Ocean, emphasizes that littoral societies have markedly different attitudes from their more parochial neighbors inland.  He quotes Ross Dunn on the “cosmopolitan frame of mind” of Muslims in East Africa, southern India, and Malaysia and adds: “This was reinforced by the coastal location and the fact that most […]

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