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A red barge of off Red Hook, Brooklyn, with the Statue of Liberty in the distance.

The Coastal History Blog 46: Watery New York

It’s easy to bury New York City underneath a list of superlatives.  On this visit, my Airbnb was in Astoria, offering me the refreshing, if fleeting, experience of living in Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Congressional district.  On a Saturday night, I took the 7 train out to Queens Night Market.  The Night Market is something like a […]

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Approaching the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich

New Perspectives on Coastal and Maritime Communities

On Friday 5 July PTUC convened a symposium on ‘New Perspectives on Coastal and Maritime Communities.’ Hosted in the atmospheric Boardroom of the Royal Museums Greenwich, the aims of the symposium were to take stock of the current state of research in this area, to continue our development of networks between researchers, academics, practitioners, and […]

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Oil painting showing a train coming in to a multi-track railyard, with ships masts and smokestacks in the distance.

A Safe Port? Railway accidents in the dock

By now – after many years of work in the ‘Port Towns & Urban Cultures’ project – it’s probably old hat to say that port towns are important intersections between land and water, liminal zones and crossing points for people, goods and ideas. These transient places are of great interest to a range of historians, […]

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Boat Building at Bridport Harbour, c.19th Century.
By Permission of Bridport Town Council

The Naval History Blog: No. 8

Why maritime history matters: Maritime highways – A personal journey. In his Pulitzer Prize winning book aptly titled The Prize, Daniel Yergin quotes Admiral ‘Jacky’ Fisher as telling Winston Churchill, on the latter’s appointment to First Lord of the Admiralty in September 1911, ‘east of Suez oil is cheaper than coal.’[1] It later became clear […]

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Sailor with a lion cub (Courtesy of Brain Witts, Curator of the HMS Excellent collection)

The Sailor Zoo and Farm in Portsmouth: Re-enchantment and Necessity (Part 1 of 2)

In 1832 the Fourth Sea Lord of the Admiralty suggested there was a need for ‘theoretical instruction’ in gunnery. Thus what had been previously considered an art became a science.[1] Marine artillery embraced the science and technology of the age, and this modernisation of gunnery was aligned with a transition from sail to steam ships. […]

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