Author Archive | Isaac Land

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The Coastal History Blog

Blog 37: Sea Blindness, or Ocean Optimism? (Part 2 of 3): A Tale of Four Tweets In my last post, I discussed why sea blindness is not the most useful way to characterize twenty-first century sensibilities.  Let’s face it, it just doesn’t make much sense at a time when beachgoers have to be warned, “Don’t […]

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The Coastal History Blog

Blog 36: Sea Blindness, or Ocean Optimism?  (Part 1 of 3) The average Briton is unaware that 95% of the goods they buy arrived on a ship.  When asked to name a “well-known British maritime personality,” most respondents said, “Captain Jack Sparrow.”  These results are set forth by the Maritime Foundation as evidence of sea […]

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Akrotiri’s “Dolphin”Taverna, not far from the ruins. Photo: Isaac Land

The Coastal History Blog

Blog 35: A Cosmopolitan Bronze Age Port? In Mediterranean studies, does the cosmopolitan port town rank alongside “sun and sea… olives and myrtle… the commonplaces pervading the literature, all description and repetition”?[1] Articles with titles like “Cosmopolitanism Reconsidered” and “The Cosmopolitan Mediterranean: Myth and Reality” have raised doubts about the whole project.[2] It’s one thing […]

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The Coastal History Blog

Blog 34: A Pacific Blackbirding Narrative To kick off 2016 on the best possible note, here is the Coastal History blog’s fourth guest post, grounded firmly in the Southern Hemisphere. I was in Sydney for a conference a few years back and left very impressed with the nearly ubiquitous signposting and commemoration of the Aboriginal […]

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The Coastal History Blog

Blog 33: Firths and Fjords I’m delighted to introduce the Coastal History blog’s third guest post, by David Worthington, Head of the Centre for History at Scotland’s University of the Highlands and Islands. David has published most widely on British and Irish connections with central Europe in the early modern period, but, in recent years, […]

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The Coastal History Blog

Blog 32 – Two Years of the Coastal History Blog I started this blog in October 2013. I would like to thank the Port Towns and Urban Cultures group for continuing to host it!  It might be a good time to look back and consider the range of themes and topics that have come across […]

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