Author Archive | Isaac Land

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‘Beneath the Pavement—the Beach!’: An Account of the Urban Beaches Workshop at the University of London

Blog 39: I’m delighted to introduce the Coastal History blog’s fifth guest post (and the third guest post in the last twelve months!).  Elsa Devienne is a Fellow at the Princeton Mellon Initiative in Architecture, Urbanism, and the Humanities. She also holds a position as ‘maîtresse de conferences’ in the department of American studies at […]

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 ​'Written by a Wave Series' Copyright Jo Atherton 2016
www.joatherton.com​

The Coastal History Blog

Blog 38: Sea Blindness, or Ocean Optimism? (part 3 of 3): Epiphany among the Manta Rays In my last post, I discussed problems of scale.  How can we visualize (and discuss) ocean-sized problems from our modest vantage point?  Is the “oceanic selfie” a path to a higher level of consciousness, or an anthropocentric dead end? […]

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The Coastal History Blog

Blog 37: Sea Blindness, or Ocean Optimism? (Part 2 of 3): A Tale of Four Tweets In my last post, I discussed why sea blindness is not the most useful way to characterize twenty-first century sensibilities.  Let’s face it, it just doesn’t make much sense at a time when beachgoers have to be warned, “Don’t […]

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The Coastal History Blog

Blog 36: Sea Blindness, or Ocean Optimism?  (Part 1 of 3) The average Briton is unaware that 95% of the goods they buy arrived on a ship.  When asked to name a “well-known British maritime personality,” most respondents said, “Captain Jack Sparrow.”  These results are set forth by the Maritime Foundation as evidence of sea […]

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Akrotiri’s “Dolphin”Taverna, not far from the ruins. Photo: Isaac Land

The Coastal History Blog

Blog 35: A Cosmopolitan Bronze Age Port? In Mediterranean studies, does the cosmopolitan port town rank alongside “sun and sea… olives and myrtle… the commonplaces pervading the literature, all description and repetition”?[1] Articles with titles like “Cosmopolitanism Reconsidered” and “The Cosmopolitan Mediterranean: Myth and Reality” have raised doubts about the whole project.[2] It’s one thing […]

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