Author Archive | Isaac Land

Drawing of steam paddle boat

47: Elevated Waterfronts: Bird’s-Eye View Maps and Urban Coastal History

Today’s guest post is from Sean Fraga, who recently received his Ph.D. in History from Princeton University, where he is currently a postgraduate research associate with the Center for Digital Humanities and the Department of History. Here, he discusses the genre (and rhetoric) of bird’s-eye view maps.  Reconstructing how the different pieces of an urban […]

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A red barge of off Red Hook, Brooklyn, with the Statue of Liberty in the distance.

The Coastal History Blog 46: Watery New York

It’s easy to bury New York City underneath a list of superlatives.  On this visit, my Airbnb was in Astoria, offering me the refreshing, if fleeting, experience of living in Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Congressional district.  On a Saturday night, I took the 7 train out to Queens Night Market.  The Night Market is something like a […]

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The Castle of the Dukes of Brittany in Nantes.  All photos by Harry Brennan.

The Coastal History Blog 43: Why the coastal history of Brittany matters

Our first post of 2018 is a guest post by Harry Brennan, who recently completed a MA History degree at Cardiff University, focusing on early modern and Atlantic history. This is the fifth guest post that has appeared in the Coastal History blog.  This contribution continues to stretch the geographical, regional, and comparative range of […]

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“Environmental History at the Coastal Edge” roundtable at ESEH in Zagreb, June 30, 2017. From left to right: Christopher Pastore, Elsa Devienne, Isaac Land, Kara Schlichting, Craig Colten, Giacomo Parrinello. Photo credit: Benjamin Furst.

The Coastal History Blog 42: Conference (and roundtable!) roundup

Apologies to regular Coastal History blog readers—I’ve been quiet for a while.  I’ve been busy with conferences, and also with getting some “thought pieces” into print.  The last year and a half has been about giving presentations, getting introduced, introducing people to each other, and alerting them to the possibilities of organizing around the new […]

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