Drawing of steam paddle boat

47: Elevated Waterfronts: Bird’s-Eye View Maps and Urban Coastal History

Today’s guest post is from Sean Fraga, who recently received his Ph.D. in History from Princeton University, where he is currently a postgraduate research associate with the Center for Digital Humanities and the Department of History. Here, he discusses the genre (and rhetoric) of bird’s-eye view maps.  Reconstructing how the different pieces of an urban […]

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CANBERRA, Australia (Feb. 10, 2015) Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert and Vice Adm. Tim Barrett, the Australian chief of navy, lay wreaths at the Royal Australian Navy Memorial on Anzac Parade. Greenert and Barrett placed the wreaths at the monument in honor of the men and women of Australia's sea service.

The Naval History Blog: No. 9

Why Naval History Matters First, we should establish what, in fact, is history. Is it the recitation of strings of dates, glorious military and naval victories, lists of kings and queens: or is it, as has been said, simply ‘one f…..g thing after another’?[1] E H Carr asked the question ‘What is history?’ He defined […]

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PhD Student John Bolt in interview

PhD Research with PTUC

  PhD Candidates John D. Bolt and Elizabeth C. Libero discuss what it is like to study with the Port Towns and Urban Cultures research group. John’s research examines the development of the Royal Marines over the nineteenth century, and Elizabeth’s research looks at British South Atlantic expeditions in the early nineteenth century. For more […]

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Dr. Beaven and Dr. Bell look over the waters of the Solent

A Walk Through Sailortown with the Sailortown App

Join PTUC’s Brad Beaven and Karl Bell on a walk through Portsmouth’s ‘Sailortown’. Professor Beaven and Dr. Bell discussed the Sailortown app and some episodes from our city’s rich history. The Sailortown app charts two walks that highlight several Portsmouth landmarks and monuments. It also allows users to access a database of historical locations such […]

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Desire is projected across ‘empty’ space in Calvino’s Invisible Cities. 

Seascape with Distant Coast, by J. M. W. Turner, c. 1830-1845. © Tate. Image reproduced by permission of Tate and under CC-BY-NC-ND 3.0 (Unported).

Port Cities and Desire in the Work of Italo Calvino

Italo Calvino’s (1923-1985) Invisible Cities is a work of fiction that continuously reimagines the city of Venice. It demonstrates that the same urban landscape may offer numerous different promises to its various spectators: of new lives and new possibilities, but also of new sensualities, transgressions, and experiments. This article will draw on a number of […]

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