The Naval History Blog: No. 4

Going with the Flow: How Maritime History Informs Civilisation In an increasingly globalized society, where much of the world’s goods travel to market along a few principal trade routes, the study of maritime history is essential to understanding various social, economic, and political trends and dynamics. For example, the pursuit of new trade routes to […]

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CFP: International Approaches to Naval Cities and Dockyards

19-20 October 2017 Swedish Naval Museum, Karlskrona We invite proposals for papers related to naval cities and dockyards from any time period. Researchers in all fields are encouraged to participate, including ethnologists, archaeologists, sociologists, economists, and historians from any relevant sub-fields, including but not limited to social, cultural, urban, economic, strategic, and naval history. We […]

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Subwarfare

CFP: Winning the Western Approaches: Unrestricted Submarine Warfare and the US Navy in Ireland, 1917-18

University College Cork 5 – 7 July 2017 Industrial warfare during the First World War extended underwater, as submarines destroyed up to 5,000 vessels and altered the course of the conflict.  Germany’s resumption of unrestricted submarine warfare in early 1917 brought the United States into the war and created severe Allied shipping loses and dangerous […]

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Dutch Attack on the Medway, June 1667 by Pieter Cornelisz van Soest,  c. 1667. Greenwich Museums. Public domain.

Major conference to mark 350th anniversary of Dutch attack on Chatham and the Medway, Amsterdam 23–24 June 2017

The Vrienden van de Witt (NL) and the Naval Dockyards Society (UK)[1] announce a major international conference to be held in on 23–24 June 2017, commemorating the 350th anniversary of the Dutch attack on Chatham Dockyard and the River Medway. This action, which culminated in the capture of the flagship Royal Charles, has traditionally been […]

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coronation-souvenir_kgv1911

The Naval History Blog: No. 3

Why Does Naval History Matter? From the early sixteenth-century to the middle of the twentieth; England, then Great Britain, became a superpower.[1]  Lambert explains “. . . one critical advantage: naval power”.[2] Contemporary writers put forward two arguments about British Naval history; the first is that Britain and especially its Navy founded the modern global system;[3] the second […]

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Theatre of War: PTUC works with the Kings Theatre, Portsmouth, on WW1 port town leisure

Port Towns and Urban Cultures is delighted to be working in partnership with the Kings Theatre.  With the help of the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s Gateways to the First World War public engagement centre Katrina Henderson, Learning and Community Engagement Officer, was put in touch with Gateways collaborators Professor Brad Beaven and Dr Melanie Bassett from the University […]

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