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Paper to Pixels: Digitising Lloyd’s Register’s Historic Ship Plan and Survey Report Collection

The Heritage & Education Centre (HEC) is cataloguing, digitising and facilitating free online access to over 1.25 million documents! Who are we? Founded in 1760, Lloyd’s Register is the oldest ship classification society in the world, ensuring the safety of vessels following professional survey. Today, this is continued by the Lloyd’s Register Group providing professional […]

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Vittore Carpaccio, “Hunting on the lagoon,” ca. 1490. [Getty Museum: public domain image] According to the Getty’s caption, these Venetian archers “use clay pellets rather than arrows in order to stun the birds and not damage their plumage.”

The Coastal History Blog No.50: Catching a Wave – Seven Years of the Coastal History Blog

Most academic blogs are about an individual researcher’s particular work and interests. What I sought to do here, instead, was to use the blog as a placeholder or “proof of concept” for a possible journal and for a new network of professionals. This, necessarily, meant that I frequently read, and wrote, outside my comfort zone, […]

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Portsmouth Literary Map_Detail

Launch of the Portsmouth Literature Interactive Map

  The English Literature section of the University of Portsmouth’s School of Areas Studies History Politics and Literature (SASHPL) are delighted to launch the ‘Portsmouth Literature Interactive Map’ You can explore notable locations from Portsmouth’s rich literary heritage and the vibrant contemporary writing scene of the city today; locate quotes from poetry, novels and plays […]

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Cresmina Dune in Cascais, Portugal, 2019. Photographs by the author unless otherwise indicated.

The Coastal History Blog 49: Coastal dunes as historical subjects

Sand has been a recurring theme here at the Coastal History Blog, from some of my earliest posts, “What are Beaches for?”,  “The Political Economy of Sand,” and a bit more indirectly, “Coasts of the Anthropocene,” followed by a post inspired by my nearest coast, the Indiana Dunes State Park facing Lake Michigan. More recently, […]

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Jenny’s side party painting un-named British  ship in Hong Kong. Eve Tar Archive

A warm stroke from shore to ship: naval homages to Hong Kong’s female side-parties

Working in unprepossessing paint-stained overalls and traditional conical hats Chinese female contractors serviced British Commonwealth and US ships anchored off Hong Kong. A South China Morning Post outlined the civilian women’s formal role when ships arrived. These ‘side parties were groups of women who would clean the vessels, chip off rust and repaint their sides, […]

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Commemorative Katori and Kashima postcard

New Research! Port Towns and Diplomacy: The British Empire and the Japanese Navy in the Early Twentieth Century

Dr Melanie Bassett, Faculty Research Fellow for Port Towns and Urban Cultures, has published an article which appears in the current edition of The International Journal of Maritime History. ‘Port Towns and Diplomacy: Japanese Naval Visits to Britain and Australia in the Early Twentieth Century’ explores the visits of the Imperial Japanese Navy to Portsmouth […]

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