Tag Archives | urban cultures

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PTUC Events Calendar

Promote your events via PTUC! If you have a Port Town, Urban, Maritime or Naval-themed event, we can include it on our website. Please contact PTUC@port.ac.uk with the details. See below for some of the events that may be of interest to you!       October 2nd Oct – Roger Morriss (University of Exeter) ‘Technology, ideology and innovation […]

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Black Preachers in Georgian Portsmouth – Public Lecture, 31st October 2016

We are delighted to welcome Dr Ryan Handley of the University of Oxford to give a talk on Black Preachers in Georgian Portsmouth.  The talk is supported by Dr Jodi Burkett’s Citizenship, ‘Race’ and Belonging (CRaB) network and raises some interesting ideas about migration and cultural clashes in a naval port town. This is especially […]

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PhD Bursaries 2015 – Come and Research With Us!

The University of Portsmouth is looking for talented potential PhD students to join us in October 2015. As a UK/EU student, you could be selected for one of 30 fully funded PhD bursary studentships, full-time, over three years. The deadline for completed applications is 4 June, 2015. The University of Portsmouth supports world-class research. In […]

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Picture postcard depicting two Boys' Brigade band members. Date unknown. Image reproduced with kind permission of David Kemp.

Port Town Pipers of the Glasgow Boys’ Brigade

Last month’s BBC Scotland documentary – Pipers of the Trenches – highlighted the cultural significance of pipe music during the battles of the First World War in the solidification of Scottish traditions, identity, and heritage within the military. The programme visited descendents of men who carried their pipes in the trenches and explored their stories […]

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Troop embarkation onto SS Majestic at Southampton dock, either December 1899 or February 1900. Image attributed to http://www.titanic-titanic.com

Imperial Identity in Port Towns: a spotlight on Southampton and Liverpool, 1900

The provincial press of the late nineteenth-century provides a fascinating insight into how imperialistic sentiment was conveyed to a newly literate working-class.[1] The provincial press adopted the conventions of ‘new journalism’, catering for working-class tastes by prioritising the reporting of sport, sensationalist news and by placing a focus upon localised issues.[2] Its rise paralleled the […]

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