Tag Archives | Royal Navy

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“The Sure Shield of Britain and of her Empire in the Hour of Trial”: sailors in the First World War

Given the upcoming centenary of the Great War this year it is understandable that we find ourselves saturated with discussions of the tragedy that befell the European empires in 1914. Yet, despite this wide and encouraging engagement with the topic, the key focus of popular debate is centred on the many millions who died fighting […]

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Greenwich Maritime Institute Research Seminar

Dr Rob James, from the Port Towns and Urban Cultures project team, will be delivering a paper entitled, “If there’s one man that I admire, that man’s a British tar”: The Navy, Identity and Leisure in Early-Twentieth Century Britain,” at the Greenwich Maritime Institute on Wednesday the 6th of November, 2013. The paper analyses popular […]

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Sailors and the ‘Invented Traditions’: the views of sailors upon the launching of warships and pageantry in the Royal Navy

During the nineteenth century pageantry became an increasingly important, ritualized facet of the Royal Navy and altered its relationship with the public.[1] Fleet Reviews no longer represented a true ‘inspection’ of the ship by the monarch but were a carefully choreographed spectacle designed to be witnessed by the public.[2] Similarly ship launches moved beyond the […]

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