Tag Archives | port history

Damaged trawlers on return to St. Andrews Dock, Hull. Postcard, 1904.

The ‘North Sea Incident’ of 1904 and the consequences for Anglo-German Relations

Though historians have begun to reassess the extent of anti-German feeling in Britain in the years preceding the outbreak of the First World War, it is nevertheless interesting to take note of an incident where a Russian naval blunder became the site of Anglo-German antagonism.[1] Taking place in the thick of the Russo-Japanese War, the […]

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portsmouth-poster

Black Preachers in Georgian Portsmouth – Public Lecture, 31st October 2016

We are delighted to welcome Dr Ryan Handley of the University of Oxford to give a talk on Black Preachers in Georgian Portsmouth.  The talk is supported by Dr Jodi Burkett’s Citizenship, ‘Race’ and Belonging (CRaB) network and raises some interesting ideas about migration and cultural clashes in a naval port town. This is especially […]

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Designing sailor tattoos

More Sickly Slums and Sailortowns

Would you know how to survive in the slums of Portsmouth’s sailortown? Do you know a ‘Dockyard Tortoise’ from a ‘Crocadillapig’?[1] In the sweltering heat of late July a lucky group of participants took part in our specially-designed youth outreach workshop, ‘Sickly Slums and Sailortowns.’ The event was coordinated by the University of Portsmouth’s UP for […]

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Docklands History Group Fifth Annual Symposium

Before the Docks: London River and Port in the Eighteenth Century Museum of London Docklands – Saturday 7th May 2016 Jointly organised by Professor Sarah Palmer and Chris Ellmers, this one-day symposium will explore how key aspects of London’s river and port developed and changed during the momentous years of the eighteenth century.   Full programme available here Further […]

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Akrotiri’s “Dolphin”Taverna, not far from the ruins. Photo: Isaac Land

The Coastal History Blog 35: A Cosmopolitan Bronze Age Port?

In Mediterranean studies, does the cosmopolitan port town rank alongside “sun and sea… olives and myrtle… the commonplaces pervading the literature, all description and repetition”?[1] Articles with titles like “Cosmopolitanism Reconsidered” and “The Cosmopolitan Mediterranean: Myth and Reality” have raised doubts about the whole project.[2] It’s one thing to state that that two or more […]

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An advertisement featured in the Eastern Morning News, 25 May 1915. 
Image used by kind permission of Hull History Centre

Transcending Space? Maritime Place Identity and Mass Mobilisation in Hull during the First World War

The city of Hull, East Yorkshire enjoyed the status of ‘third port’ with a booming, world-renowned fishing industry on the outbreak of war on 4 August 1914. This industry, employing many thousands of local men and women in trawling and peripheral works, was fundamentally altered by ‘total war’, as civilian fishing vessels and their men […]

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