Tag Archives | Pirates

Bartholomew Roberts with his ship and captured merchant ships in the background. A copper engraving from 'A History of the Pyrates' by Captain Charles Johnson c. 1724

CFP: Buccaneers, Corsairs, Pirates and Privateers – Connecting the Early Modern Seas. International Symposium, 13-14 April 2018

International Symposium, FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg & University of Bielefeld Bielefeld University (Germany), 13-14 April 2018 Deadline for submissions: 9 August 2017 Until recently manifestations of piracy as well as of its state-sanctioned counterpart, privateering, were mostly discussed as geographically isolated cultural phenomena. Depictions of armed robbery at sea in the early modern period have traditionally tended to focus […]

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The Pirate Next Door_Cover

Book Review: ‘The Pirate Next Door: The Untold Story of Eighteenth Century Pirates’ Wives, Families and Communities’

Book Review by James H Thomas on Daphne Palmer Geanacopoulos, The Pirate Next Door: The Untold Story of Eighteenth Century Pirates’ Wives, Families and Communities (Carolina Academic Press: Durham, North Carolina, 2017), 147pp. £11-12 (Kindle and Paperback). This is a slim volume which promises much, delving ‘into the inner lives of pirates, focusing on their […]

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The Naval History Blog: No. 4

Going with the Flow: How Maritime History Informs Civilisation In an increasingly globalized society, where much of the world’s goods travel to market along a few principal trade routes, the study of maritime history is essential to understanding various social, economic, and political trends and dynamics. For example, the pursuit of new trade routes to […]

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Gibbet2

Dead Men Telling Tales: Maritime Gibbet Lore in Nineteenth-Century Popular Culture

The practice of gibbeting, also known more specifically as hanging in irons, or hanging in chains, was a particularly macabre punishment for a variety of convicted felons, and yet it is the image of the pirate cadaver swinging eerily in the breeze, which appears to have become most engrained in popular culture since the eighteenth […]

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