Tag Archives | navy

The Naval History Blog: No. 1

Why Does Naval History Matter? The first question to consider before approaching a response to why naval history matters is: why does any history matter? Before the professionalization of the field in the nineteenth century, the answer to this question seemed fairly obvious; historians “took it for granted that history furnished the basis for a […]

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Review: Daniel Owen Spence, Colonial Naval Culture and British Imperialism, 1922-67

Review: Daniel Owen Spence, Colonial Naval Culture and British Imperialism, 1922-67. Manchester University Press, Studies in Imperialism, 2015 – full details here. This is not your traditional naval history. Aligning himself with those whom he describes as ‘cultural-naval historians’ (2), Spence aims – as he puts it in the book’s final sentence – to understand […]

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PhD Bursary Opportunity – Royal Naval Pursery in the Development of Accounting

Studentship title: ‘Nipcheese’ the Bean Counter: The Implications of Royal Naval Pursery in the Development of Accounting Closing date: Tuesday 21st April 2015 Preliminary explorations of maritime and accounting archives and historical literature in the Royal Navy [RN] Dockyard Library, Portsmouth, have considered the role and significance of pursers on RN ships (1600 to 1850) […]

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“The Sure Shield of Britain and of her Empire in the Hour of Trial”: sailors in the First World War

Given the upcoming centenary of the Great War this year it is understandable that we find ourselves saturated with discussions of the tragedy that befell the European empires in 1914. Yet, despite this wide and encouraging engagement with the topic, the key focus of popular debate is centred on the many millions who died fighting […]

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