Tag Archives | naval history

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Greenwich Maritime Institute Short Courses 2014

Greenwich Maritime Institute, University of Greenwich are offering three new short courses for 2014: The following new course are available to book – Tuesday 3rd June 2014: China’s Seaborne Trade and Martime Defence in the Current Era This one-day course will investigate China’s rapid growth in seaborne trade of all types and the impact upon global maritime […]

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Naval and Maritime Power Conference

Global War Studies and the Greenwich Maritime Institute are pleased to announce an international conference on the naval and maritime history of the First and Second World Wars to be held on the 11th – 12th April 2014. On the centenary of the First World War, the conference seeks to promote an international and interdisciplinary dialogue […]

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“The Sure Shield of Britain and of her Empire in the Hour of Trial”: sailors in the First World War

Given the upcoming centenary of the Great War this year it is understandable that we find ourselves saturated with discussions of the tragedy that befell the European empires in 1914. Yet, despite this wide and encouraging engagement with the topic, the key focus of popular debate is centred on the many millions who died fighting […]

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PTUC PhD Bursary Available at the University of Portsmouth!

PTUC is looking for new researchers. The School of Social, Historical and Literary Studies are offering a full time PhD bursary for a study connected with the History of Port Towns and Urban Cultures. Title: PhD Bursary – History of Port Towns and Urban Cultures Application deadline: Wednesday 26 February 2014 Start date: October 2014 Project description: The Port Towns […]

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Sailors and the ‘Invented Traditions’: the views of sailors upon the launching of warships and pageantry in the Royal Navy

During the nineteenth century pageantry became an increasingly important, ritualized facet of the Royal Navy and altered its relationship with the public.[1] Fleet Reviews no longer represented a true ‘inspection’ of the ship by the monarch but were a carefully choreographed spectacle designed to be witnessed by the public.[2] Similarly ship launches moved beyond the […]

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