Tag Archives | maritime history

The Naval History Blog: No. 6

The tide creeps in: why maritime history matters Can we even imagine a world without the sea and its influence? Trying to define maritime history in his introduction to ‘The Sea and Civilization’, Lincoln Paine asks the opposite question: what exactly is ‘terrestrial history’? He tries to re-imagine the story of mankind as a land-bound […]

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Chateauwood, Passchendaele

Passchendaele Centenary: PTUC helps Portsmouth Poetry to secure £10,000 HLF grant

Cultural organisation ‘Portsmouth Poetry’ has been awarded a grant of £10,000 by the Heritage Lottery Fund’s  ‘First World War: then and now’ programme for their “I Died In Hell” project. The project will commemorate the centenary of the Battle of Passchendaele, 1917 by focusing on the stories of Portsmouth people who participated in one of the worst conflicts […]

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The Naval History Blog: No. 4

Going with the Flow: How Maritime History Informs Civilisation In an increasingly globalized society, where much of the world’s goods travel to market along a few principal trade routes, the study of maritime history is essential to understanding various social, economic, and political trends and dynamics. For example, the pursuit of new trade routes to […]

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coronation-souvenir_kgv1911

The Naval History Blog: No. 3

Why Does Naval History Matter? From the early sixteenth-century to the middle of the twentieth; England, then Great Britain, became a superpower.[1]  Lambert explains “. . . one critical advantage: naval power”.[2] Contemporary writers put forward two arguments about British Naval history; the first is that Britain and especially its Navy founded the modern global system;[3] the second […]

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