Tag Archives | island studies

 ​'Written by a Wave Series' Copyright Jo Atherton 2016
www.joatherton.com​

The Coastal History Blog

Blog 38: Sea Blindness, or Ocean Optimism? (part 3 of 3): Epiphany among the Manta Rays In my last post, I discussed problems of scale.  How can we visualize (and discuss) ocean-sized problems from our modest vantage point?  Is the “oceanic selfie” a path to a higher level of consciousness, or an anthropocentric dead end? […]

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Port towns

New: Port Towns & Urban Cultures Edited Book

Port Towns & Urban Cultures: International Histories of the Waterfront, c.1700 – 2000, Eds. Brad Beaven, Karl Bell and Robert James, (Palgrave Macmillan: Basingstoke, 2016) Despite the port’s prominence in maritime history, its cultural significance has long been neglected in favour of its role within economic and imperial networks. Defined by their intersection of maritime […]

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The Coastal History Blog

Blog 36: Sea Blindness, or Ocean Optimism?  (Part 1 of 3) The average Briton is unaware that 95% of the goods they buy arrived on a ship.  When asked to name a “well-known British maritime personality,” most respondents said, “Captain Jack Sparrow.”  These results are set forth by the Maritime Foundation as evidence of sea […]

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The Coastal History Blog

Blog 34: A Pacific Blackbirding Narrative To kick off 2016 on the best possible note, here is the Coastal History blog’s fourth guest post, grounded firmly in the Southern Hemisphere. I was in Sydney for a conference a few years back and left very impressed with the nearly ubiquitous signposting and commemoration of the Aboriginal […]

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The Coastal History Blog

Blog 31:  “The Intolerant Coast” The Syrian refugee crisis has brought forth a broad humanitarian response and also some thoughtful pieces from historians. On the “refugee or migrant” question, Le Monde interviewed Gérard Noiriel in a conversation that harked back all the way to the sixteenth century.[1] In the Guardian, Mary Beard commented on how […]

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