Tag Archives | isaac land

Maritime Masculinities conference – book now

Registration is open for the Maritime Masculinities conference which takes place at St Anne’s College Oxford on the 19th and 20th December.   Maritime Masculinities covers the period from 1815 – 1940, which saw the demise of the sail ship, the rise of steam and oil-powered ships, the erosion of British naval and maritime supremacy […]

Continue Reading 0
 ​'Written by a Wave Series' Copyright Jo Atherton 2016
www.joatherton.com​

The Coastal History Blog 38: Sea Blindness, or Ocean Optimism? (part 3 of 3): Epiphany among the Manta Rays

  In my last post, I discussed problems of scale.  How can we visualize (and discuss) ocean-sized problems from our modest vantage point?  Is the “oceanic selfie” a path to a higher level of consciousness, or an anthropocentric dead end? When that post went online, I was in Hawaii and had just finished a couple […]

Continue Reading 3
hhhh

The Coastal History Blog 37: Sea Blindness, or Ocean Optimism? (Part 2 of 3): A Tale of Four Tweets

In my last post, I discussed why sea blindness is not the most useful way to characterize twenty-first century sensibilities.  Let’s face it, it just doesn’t make much sense at a time when beachgoers have to be warned, “Don’t take selfies with seals.”  Instead, I argued, we should think critically about sea visibility, which is […]

Continue Reading 0
Port towns

New: Port Towns & Urban Cultures Edited Book

Port Towns & Urban Cultures: International Histories of the Waterfront, c.1700 – 2000, Eds. Brad Beaven, Karl Bell and Robert James, (Palgrave Macmillan: Basingstoke, 2016) Despite the port’s prominence in maritime history, its cultural significance has long been neglected in favour of its role within economic and imperial networks. Defined by their intersection of maritime […]

Continue Reading 0
second

The Coastal History Blog 36: Sea Blindness, or Ocean Optimism? (Part 1 of 3)

The average Briton is unaware that 95% of the goods they buy arrived on a ship.  When asked to name a “well-known British maritime personality,” most respondents said, “Captain Jack Sparrow.”  These results are set forth by the Maritime Foundation as evidence of sea blindness.[i] Duncan Redford is one of the few people so far […]

Continue Reading 2
players

Call for Papers: Maritime Masculinities, 1815-1940

Maritime Masculinities, 1815-1940 19th- 20th December, 2016, Oxford, UK Keynote speakers include: Dr Mary Conley, College of the Holy Cross, USA Prof. Joanne Begiato,  Oxford Brookes University Dr Isaac Land, Indiana State University, USA The Department of History, Philosophy & Religion, Oxford Brookes University, and the Port Towns and Urban Cultures group, University of Portsmouth, invite […]

Continue Reading 0