Tag Archives | isaac land

Nile Delta at night, NASA Earth Observatory 2010. Public Domain.

The Coastal History Blog 51: Following the Nile to Coastal History

The first Coastal History Blog post to engage with rivers was in 2014, when I blogged about the “Rivers of the Anthropocene” conference that I attended in Indianapolis. This conference later resulted in a fine interdisciplinary volume edited by the historian Jason Kelly and the other organizers. More recent scholarship on rivers includes the widely […]

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Vittore Carpaccio, “Hunting on the lagoon,” ca. 1490. [Getty Museum: public domain image] According to the Getty’s caption, these Venetian archers “use clay pellets rather than arrows in order to stun the birds and not damage their plumage.”

The Coastal History Blog No.50: Catching a Wave – Seven Years of the Coastal History Blog

Most academic blogs are about an individual researcher’s particular work and interests. What I sought to do here, instead, was to use the blog as a placeholder or “proof of concept” for a possible journal and for a new network of professionals. This, necessarily, meant that I frequently read, and wrote, outside my comfort zone, […]

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Gotham City - a representation of coastal history

The Coastal History Blog 45: Crime Alley? Port Cities and Batman’s Gotham

I’m delighted to introduce our seventh guest post, by Madison Heslop.  She is a PhD candidate in History at the University of Washington.  While there is a well-known and rich literature on “the idea of the city” or “the image of the city,” there’s a surprising shortage of smart, thoughtful pieces on where waterfronts and […]

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The Castle of the Dukes of Brittany in Nantes.  All photos by Harry Brennan.

The Coastal History Blog 43: Why the coastal history of Brittany matters

Our first post of 2018 is a guest post by Harry Brennan, who recently completed a MA History degree at Cardiff University, focusing on early modern and Atlantic history. This is the fifth guest post that has appeared in the Coastal History blog.  This contribution continues to stretch the geographical, regional, and comparative range of […]

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