Tag Archives | empire

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Navigating Empire: Ports, Ships and Global History

Professor Jonathan Hyslop delivered a fascinating and stimulating keynote lecture for the Social History Conference delegates on the 1st April 2015 entitled ‘Navigating Empire: Ports, Ships and Global History,’ an excerpt of which is below. The lecture was a call to theorize three core elements of the maritime in connecting transnational, imperial and global histories, […]

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Review: Daniel Owen Spence, Colonial Naval Culture and British Imperialism, 1922-67

Review: Daniel Owen Spence, Colonial Naval Culture and British Imperialism, 1922-67. Manchester University Press, Studies in Imperialism, 2015 – full details here. This is not your traditional naval history. Aligning himself with those whom he describes as ‘cultural-naval historians’ (2), Spence aims – as he puts it in the book’s final sentence – to understand […]

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Christmas Wishes From the Fleet

As it is approaching Christmas I thought it might be appropriate to put a few of the Christmas themed sources I have accrued to some use. Considering naval men were (as they still are) often away from home at Christmas, it comes as no surprise that they often sent home Christmas cards to family at […]

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Picture postcard depicting two Boys' Brigade band members. Date unknown. Image reproduced with kind permission of David Kemp.

Port Town Pipers of the Glasgow Boys’ Brigade

Last month’s BBC Scotland documentary – Pipers of the Trenches – highlighted the cultural significance of pipe music during the battles of the First World War in the solidification of Scottish traditions, identity, and heritage within the military. The programme visited descendents of men who carried their pipes in the trenches and explored their stories […]

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Troop embarkation onto SS Majestic at Southampton dock, either December 1899 or February 1900. Image attributed to http://www.titanic-titanic.com

Imperial Identity in Port Towns: a spotlight on Southampton and Liverpool, 1900

The provincial press of the late nineteenth-century provides a fascinating insight into how imperialistic sentiment was conveyed to a newly literate working-class.[1] The provincial press adopted the conventions of ‘new journalism’, catering for working-class tastes by prioritising the reporting of sport, sensationalist news and by placing a focus upon localised issues.[2] Its rise paralleled the […]

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