Tag Archives | coastal history

Vittore Carpaccio, “Hunting on the lagoon,” ca. 1490. [Getty Museum: public domain image] According to the Getty’s caption, these Venetian archers “use clay pellets rather than arrows in order to stun the birds and not damage their plumage.”

The Coastal History Blog No.50: Catching a Wave – Seven Years of the Coastal History Blog

Most academic blogs are about an individual researcher’s particular work and interests. What I sought to do here, instead, was to use the blog as a placeholder or “proof of concept” for a possible journal and for a new network of professionals. This, necessarily, meant that I frequently read, and wrote, outside my comfort zone, […]

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Cresmina Dune in Cascais, Portugal, 2019. Photographs by the author unless otherwise indicated.

The Coastal History Blog 49: Coastal dunes as historical subjects

Sand has been a recurring theme here at the Coastal History Blog, from some of my earliest posts, “What are Beaches for?”,  “The Political Economy of Sand,” and a bit more indirectly, “Coasts of the Anthropocene,” followed by a post inspired by my nearest coast, the Indiana Dunes State Park facing Lake Michigan. More recently, […]

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George_Morland_-_The_Wreckers_-_1993.41_-_Museum_of_Fine_Arts

Fully Funded PhD Opportunity! Shipwreck Shores: Wrecking and Coastal Cultures in Britain and Sweden, 1700-1850

We at Port Towns and Urban Cultures are excited to announce a fully funded “Coastal History” PhD opportunity. This split-site PhD will provide the successful candidate with the unique opportunity to research and teach in both Britain and Sweden, thanks to a new collaboration established between the University of Portsmouth and Halmstad University. The PhD […]

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Desire is projected across ‘empty’ space in Calvino’s Invisible Cities. 

Seascape with Distant Coast, by J. M. W. Turner, c. 1830-1845. © Tate. Image reproduced by permission of Tate and under CC-BY-NC-ND 3.0 (Unported).

Port Cities and Desire in the Work of Italo Calvino

Italo Calvino’s (1923-1985) Invisible Cities is a work of fiction that continuously reimagines the city of Venice. It demonstrates that the same urban landscape may offer numerous different promises to its various spectators: of new lives and new possibilities, but also of new sensualities, transgressions, and experiments. This article will draw on a number of […]

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