Tag Archives | blog

Men leaving DY, Unicorn Gate

The Royal Dockyard Worker – Nationalism, Regionalism and British identity in early 20th century England

ICYMI – PTUC Research Associate, Melanie Bassett, contributed to History @ Portsmouth, the blog page of the University of Portsmouth’s history team. The site offers an exciting snapshot into the research interests of both staff and students, and showcases our various academic outputs and public history outreach. Dr Bassett detailed her contribution to a new […]

Continue Reading 0
coronation-souvenir_kgv1911

The Naval History Blog: No. 3

Why Does Naval History Matter? From the early sixteenth-century to the middle of the twentieth; England, then Great Britain, became a superpower.[1]  Lambert explains “. . . one critical advantage: naval power”.[2] Contemporary writers put forward two arguments about British Naval history; the first is that Britain and especially its Navy founded the modern global system;[3] the second […]

Continue Reading 0
Figure 1: Anon., Neptune Supporting his Favorite Son Admiral Lord Nelson, 1806, Royal Museums Greenwich

The Naval History Blog: No. 2

Why Does Naval History Matter? As a student of history, I have often met with the question ‘but why does history matter?’ Naval history, a specialised and unique branch of academic study, is met with a stronger question about its relevance, even amongst historians, being dismissed as simply ships, scurvy and sea dogs. Naval history […]

Continue Reading 0
cp_santa_monica_ok_devienne__57

The Coastal History Blog 39: ‘Beneath the Pavement—the Beach!’: An Account of the Urban Beaches Workshop at the University of London

I’m delighted to introduce the Coastal History blog’s fifth guest post (and the third guest post in the last twelve months!).  Elsa Devienne is a Fellow at the Princeton Mellon Initiative in Architecture, Urbanism, and the Humanities. She also holds a position as ‘maîtresse de conferences’ in the department of American studies at Université Paris […]

Continue Reading 0