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The Boys’ Brigade in Port Towns – Camping and the Case of Bristol c.1888-1920

  In 1888 the Boys’ Brigade in Scotland was prevalent in portside cities. Glasgow (93 Companies), Edinburgh (17), and Ayr (6) were home to the largest Battalions.[1]  When the movement became established south of the border this pattern was replicated.  By the end of the century London was the second largest area of strength nationally […]

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Play Up, Play the Game! The Press and Civic Rivalry between Port Town Football Clubs in the Edwardian Era

The role of class, gender and place identity formation through the support of the local football team has been explored by a number of historians.[1] Through local rivalries and the celebration of civic pride football supporters were able to make sense of their urban environment and their place in the world.[2] Portsmouth’s ‘Pompey Chimes’ chant […]

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“They Had no Inhibitions Did They?” Pub Going in a Port Town 1939-1945

Young women workers public house attendance during the war and attitudes towards it highlights variety in opinions. They reveal both continuity and change regarding young woman’s place in the public sphere and how young women should behave. Oral testimonies reflect similar responses that generally it was becoming more acceptable for women to drink in pubs; […]

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“We Were Proud of What We Did” – A Wren’s Reflections of Serving in a Port Town, 1939-1945

Analysis of Grace’s narrative reveals a number of striking features about her period of service in the Women’s Royal Naval Service (WRNS) at Lee-on-Solent. She felt part of a clearly identifiable group, her uniform distinguished her from the other services and civilians and she felt proud of her part in the war effort. Grace therefore […]

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Sailors and the ‘Invented Traditions’: the views of sailors upon the launching of warships and pageantry in the Royal Navy

During the nineteenth century pageantry became an increasingly important, ritualized facet of the Royal Navy and altered its relationship with the public.[1] Fleet Reviews no longer represented a true ‘inspection’ of the ship by the monarch but were a carefully choreographed spectacle designed to be witnessed by the public.[2] Similarly ship launches moved beyond the […]

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News from the Cape: celebrating the exploits of naval brigades amongst the local community

The Boer War marked the first time that Britain utilized citizen-soldiers to support its regular forces in combat.[1] It has been argued that this led to an increased sense of pride both on national and local levels.[2] This article seeks to explore the often overlooked involvement of the Naval Brigades, who played a vital supporting role […]

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